Food Trend Predictions for 2010

| December 30, 2009 | 3 Comments

IMG_5865.jpgUsually, at the end of the year, I do a few year-end wrap ups. I really didn’t want to do days and days of that this year (there will be a fun list post tomorrow though!). So, this year I decided to do it a little differently.

Every year, many publications put out lists of what they think the food trends for the following year will be. I’ve always thought it was an interesting thing … something just out of my reach. But this year, I had a few thoughts on where food is going next. So, why can’t I join in?

Without further ado, these are my very own food trend predictions for 2010. Enjoy!

Fewer Better

The restaurant industry has been hit hard by the recession. People just aren’t eating out as much, since they can’t afford it. That means restaurant closings, layoffs and more. I don’t foresee that stopping quite yet.

In 2010, I think we will see a landscape of fewer restaurants — but the ones that remain will be producing better food with better ingredients. Survival of the fittest and all that.

Slimming Down

Dear Butter and Bacon, We still love you. But we need some time apart. Sorry, but our days of weaving bacon baskets and buttering our butter are over. But, we wish you the best.

In the past few years, there has been what seemed like a disregard for calories and nutrition when it came to good food. High in fat? So what, as long as it’s tasty, right? Not anymore. Documentaries in recent years like Food, Inc. and Super Size Me have bought to the forefront the problems of our food system and eating habits in the U.S. and I think people are finally listening.

In 2010, I think we will see a larger focus on producing not only healthier food (and recipes) but a mainstream push for it. It won’t be a fat-free revolution, but it will be a lightening up of recipes.

More Local

There’s been a brewing movement of local-eating and sustainable growing for quite awhile. The term CSA (that’s community supported agriculture) has entered the mainstream vocab. More people are interested in buying locally, supporting local food systems and even growing their own. Totally a good shift.

In 2010, I think we will see this trend really get a solid footing as a “norm” for more people. Furthermore, I think we will see a great increase in home growing.

More Cook with Kids Resources

People are still being deeply impacted by unemployment and the down economy. As a result, the things families do together have shifted. Less nights at restaurants, more eating at home. Less time spent spending at the local more, and more time on at-home activities … like cooking.

The book world and the internet are noticing. In 2010, I think we’ll see a great increase on resources to help parents get into the kitchen with their kids and spend some good ol’fashioned time cooking together. And really, it’s so fun. You should be doing it anyway. I do!

What do you think the big food trends will be in 2010? Share in the comments!

Category: Thoughts

About the Author ()

Sarah W. Caron is a freelance writer, editor and recipe developer. Her work has appeared in countless online and print publications including iVillage, BELLA NYC Magazine, Yum for Kids magazine and more. She lives in Connecticut with her two kids, two beagles and husband.

Comments (3)

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  1. Sophie says:

    Nice predictions–I agree with a number of them. I hope we don’t say goodbye to bacon and butter, just that we learn what a portion is and learn to be satisfied with that.

  2. Julia says:

    Dare I suggest that the cookie – (good old comforting cookies!) will make it’s way back into our good graces — I’ve got a feeling that cupcakes have had their day….As for local– yes, yes more local eveything – CSAs, locavores, local pride in our food! I think of SF as a great role model for great local food-living! Happy 2010!

  3. I love the More Local prediction! Especially the homegrown aspect of it. Last year was the first time I attempted a garden in earnest. I was only minimally successful, but it was a GREAT learning experience and I have no doubt I’ll see greater yield this year.

    It’s such a wonderful thing, eating food you grew yourself. Not only is it guaranteed to be seasonal, and likely to be flavorful and pesticide-free (personal choice variables notwithstanding) but there’s a much deeper sense of appreciation for, and, dare I say, connection with every mouthful. Plus: FRUGAL! Doesn’t get much more so than that.

    Again, great thoughts overall!

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