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Creamy Potato Leek Soup with Bacon

Sour cream is swirled into this Creamy Potato Leek Soup with Bacon recipe, giving it a silky, smooth texture that’s total comfort-food.

Bacon Potato Leek Soup Recipe

A dear old friend and I spoke on the phone the other night. It had been awhile and we had much to catch up on. Amid stories of graduate school projects (hers) and being beaten into submission by my first cold, snowy Maine winter (me), I realized that all they say about true friendship is quite accurate. In a good friendship, you can go months without talking and always pick up right where you left off.

We laughed, talking about the colleges near where we grew up — and our skewed perceptions of them. From work to kids, we wound our way through our lives in the same nonstop flow of our girlhood conversations.

“You seem happy,” she said, as our conversation winded down.

The observation is one I’ve heard from many people since last June when we moved to Maine. And although I am, to hear others say it is always a surprise. It leaves me wondering how I seemed before. Was I noticeably stressed? Was I not enthusiastic? Or is the observation more like it felt — that I came alive with this new adventure. She told me it’s more of the latter.

Friendship gets harder as you age, I think, particularly if you find yourself geographically removed from each other. While you once swore you’d never let anything come between you, young minds don’t realize the breadth of responsibilities that come with age, homeownership, children and career advancement. Without a conscious effort to remain connected, it’s easy to take those old friends for granted and let time slide by until weeks have turned from months to years.

Likewise, it’s harder to make new friends too. Or it is for me, at least. While my 7-year-old daughter can make friends wherever we go, I don’t share that talent. While I smile and say hello to people I see often, I am slow to connect and even slower to open up even a little. And to go from casual hellos at soccer to grabbing lunch? Ha! That’s a transition I haven’t even come close to mastering.

But those old friendships? Those are the ones to always nurture, whether you have new friends or not. They need the effort and are worth it. When you’ve weathered so many storms together and shared so many joys, you shouldn’t let go easily.

And there’s a certain comfort in knowing your oldest, dearest friends will also hold on, and will always be there for you.

Potato Leek Soup with Bacon

Speaking of comfort, this Creamy Potato Leek Soup with Bacon is comfort too — comfort food, that is. It’s a hint of late summer when leeks are in season and evenings are just starting to take on that edge of a chill. But it’s also warm and rich, perfect for winter’s harsh nights. Filled with nuanced flavor thanks to the combination of flavors and the addition of salty, rich bacon, it’s a perfect dinner for anytime.

Take a little time in the kitchen, preparing this soup. And then ladle out a steaming bowl to enjoy with bread and perhaps a salad. Leftovers can be store to reheat for lunches during the week.

Creamy Potato Leek Soup with Bacon

Creamy Potato Leek Soup with Bacon

Yield: 4 servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 50 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 large leeks, , white and light green parts chopped, soaked
  • 1 lb Yukon gold potatoes, , peeled and cubed
  • 4 cups low-sodium chicken stock
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 – 1 tsp Sriracha hot sauce
  • Salt and pepper, , to taste
  • 4 slices thick cut bacon, , browned and crumbled

Instructions

  1. Heat the olive oil in a Dutch oven. Add the leeks and saute, stirring occasionally, for 8-10 minutes, until softened. Add the potatoes to the pot, stir well. Pour in the chicken stock and cover. Cook over medium heat for 20-25 minutes, until the potatoes are tender.
  2. Remove the lid from the Dutch oven and use an immersion blender to blend the soup until smooth. Stir in the sour cream and hot sauce. Taste, and season with salt and pepper as desired. Stir in the bacon and serve immediately.
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Kate

Monday 9th of March 2015

I have so many of those kind of friends where we don't talk for ages and then fall right back into step.